Tasbuilt Homes Offers Double Glazed Windows as a standard inclusion

Your home will be easier to heat in winter, cool in summer and your power bills will be much lower...

Tasbuilt Homes Offers Double Glazed Windows as a standard inclusion

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As part of our commitment to providing highest quality homes to Tasmanians, Tasbuilt has included double glazing as a standard inclusion for over three years now.  Double glazing means your windows are made from not just one sheet of glass but two, separated by an airspace which is filled with a gas and sealed off.  This means hot or cold air cannot easily escape through the glass.  The result?  Your home is easier to heat in winter, and cool in summer, and your power bills are much lower.  Many Tasmanians have learnt to accept double glazing as the standard, but only a few builders include it as part of their standard package.  Another great reason to choose Tasbuilt for your new home – no surprises… guaranteed!

Why Use double glazing in your new home

Double glazing is the glazing process in which a window is formed by two panes of glass with a space between the panes. The space between the glass is usually several millimeters thick. Air is trapped between the panes of glass and forms a layer of insulation. Before the unit is sealed, a drying agent is added to ensure that no moisture is present inside the finished glass unit.

Around 60% of heat loss in the home occurs through standard, single pane windows. Double glazing substantially stops heat loss. The cost of the double glazing will pay for itself very quickly in the money you save from heating bills. Once the double glazing has been installed, your heating costs should decrease by around 10 to 12%.

Double glazing is also very friendly to the environment. Our homes cause around 28% of all carbon dioxide emissions, and replacing single pane windows helps to reduce these emissions and combat energy loss. As well as saving on heating bills, double glazing is very good at cutting down on noise pollution and internal condensation.